Continental Carbon Company agrees to reduce air pollution

March 30, 2015

Carbon black material manufacturer Continental Carbon Company has reached a settlement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Justice to reduce air pollution caused by its facilities in Alabama, Oklahoma and Texas.

According to the terms of the $98 million agreement Continental Carbon Company will pay a civil penalty of $650,000, to be shared with co-plaintiffs in the case, the state governments of Alabama and Oklahoma. Additionally they will spend $550,000 on environmental projects to help mitigate the harmful effects of air pollution on the environment and to benefit local communities, including at least $25,000 on energy efficiency projects in the communities near each of the three facilities.

The company will install additional air quality control equipment at each of the facilities in question over the next six years, in cooperation with the EPA. A spokesperson for Continental Carbon Company told Business Wire that the manufacturer has always understood their responsibilities to the environment and are fully prepared to meet the new emission levels agreed upon with the EPA.

Cynthia Giles, assistant administrator for EPA's Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance. said, "This settlement brings another major carbon black company into compliance with a law that protects clean air for American communities. By installing the latest pollution control technology and funding environmental projects, Continental is taking steps to reduce emissions of air pollutants that can lead to serious health problems."

Assistant Attorney General John C. Cruden for the Justice Department's Environment and Natural Resources Division added that the agreement would be welcome news for residents of the areas near the three facilities, who would be able to enjoy cleaner air in the years to come.

Working with environmental consultants, manufacturing companies can ensure that they are meeting standards set by state and federal authorities.